Ebola: What you Need to Know

Many people are concerned about the current Ebola outbreak in the West African countries of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. Below is a Q&A from the Centers for Disease Control on Ebola and why it does not currently pose a significant risk to the United States.

What is Ebola?
Ebola virus is the cause of a viral hemorrhagic fever disease. Symptoms include: fever, headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, lack of appetite, and abnormal bleeding. Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2-21 days after exposure to ebolavirus, though 8-10 days is most common.

How is Ebola transmitted?
Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected symptomatic person or through exposure to objects (such as needles) that have been contaminated with infected secretions.

Can Ebola be transmitted through the air?
No. Ebola is not a respiratory disease like the flu, so it is not transmitted through the air.

Can I get Ebola from contaminated food or water?
No.

Can I get Ebola from a person who is infected but doesn’t have any symptoms?
No. Individuals who are not symptomatic are not contagious. In order for the virus to be transmitted, an individual would have to have direct contact with an individual who is experiencing symptoms.

Are there any cases of individuals contracting Ebola in the U.S.?
No.

To learn more about Ebola, click here.

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