Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality

HEI 2014_bug finalWe are proud to have been recognized for the third year in a row as a “Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality” by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, through their Healthcare Equality Index 2014. The Healthcare Equality Index is an annual survey that encourages equal care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans and recognizes healthcare institutions doing the best work.

Duke Regional was one of 426 healthcare facilities nationwide to be named Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality. Facilities awarded this title meet key criteria, including patient and employee non-discrimination policies that specifically mention sexual orientation and gender identity, a guarantee of equal visitation for same-sex partners and parents and LGBT health education for key staff members.

For more information about the Healthcare Equality Index 2014, or to download a free copy of the report, visit www.hrc.org/hei.

Improving Stroke Care

FAST2According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number four cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

Given these alarming statistics, Duke Regional takes stroke care very seriously. We have worked to improve care for our stroke patients and have been awarded several times by many organizations as a result. Most recently we received the Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

We earned this award by meeting specific quality achievement measures, including aggressive use of medications and risk-reduction therapies aimed at reducing death and disability and improving the lives of stroke patients.

In addition, we received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll for meeting stroke quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. People who suffer a stroke who receive the drug within three hours of the onset of symptoms may recover quicker and are less likely to suffer severe disability.

We also take the time to educate stroke patients to manage their risk factors, be aware of warning signs for stroke and ensure they take their medications properly. Additionally, we offer a monthly stroke support group for stroke patients and the community. To register for an upcoming session, click here.

To learn more about stroke, visit strokeassociation.org

Enjoy Fall Fruits and Veggies

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Elizabeth Villalta, MS, RD, LDN

Registered dietician Elizabeth Villalta of the Duke Center for Metabolic and Weight Loss Surgery shares ways you can incorporate fall’s finest fruits and vegetables into your meals.

As we head into fall, there is no need to decrease our produce intake. We should (and can) continue to eat a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. Fall is a great time for squash, cranberries, ginger, mushrooms, passion fruit, sweet potatoes, turnips and more. Below are a few ways you can enjoy fall produce.

Acorn Squash
Acorn squash can be added as a side dish or sauce, or steal the show as the main entrée! If you’re tired of the same old spaghetti dinner, try cooking thinly sliced acorn squash just like you would spaghetti. Acorn squash is fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free and a good source of vitamin C. One-half cup of acorn squash contains just seven grams of carbohydrates, where one-half cup of spaghetti contains 21 grams. Click here for more ways to enjoy acorn squash.

Cranberry
Cranberry is another fall classic that is low in fat and sodium and a good source of vitamin C and fiber. While this fruit is often thought of with a big turkey dinner, cranberries can be added to breakfast cereal, trail mix and even dessert. For more ideas on adding cranberry into your diet click here.

Pumpkin
It isn’t just for carving! Pumpkin can be incorporated into everything from soup and salad to muffins and dessert. Are you looking to try a new smoothie recipe? Try adding pumpkin into your shake! Pumpkin seeds are also a fun seasonal treat and a good source of protein. Click here for 10 great ways to add pumpkin into your fall diet.

Know Your Medications

Assortment of pills and supplementsYou play an important role in helping reduce medication errors. Be sure you understand exactly what you are taking and why. Use this checklist to help you get the information you need from your physician:

  • What is the name of the medicine? What is its generic name?
  • Why am I taking this medicine?
  • What dose will I be taking? How often, and for how long?
  • When will the medicine begin to work?
  • What are the possible side effects?
  • Can I take this medicine while taking my other medications or dietary supplements?
  • Are there any foods, drinks or activities I should avoid while taking this medicine?
  • Should I take my medicine at meals or between meals?
  • Do I need to take the medicine on an empty stomach or with food or a whole glass of water?
  • What should I do if I forget to take the medicine and miss a dose?

Preventing Medication Errors
Be sure all your physicians know what medications you have been taking, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, herbal and vitamin supplements, natural remedies and recreational drugs.

Be sure all your physicians know of any allergies you may have—to medications, anesthesia, foods, latex products, etc.

Special Care Nursery Patient Reunion

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Yui-Lin Tang, MD with one of the Special Care Nursery graduates and her family.

On Saturday we held our first Special Care Nursery patient reunion for our tiniest patients and their families. Special Care Nursery “graduates” from the past three years were invited to a day of fun at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, including an animal encounter, photo booth, museum admission and lunch.

Nearly 300 people attended the Dr. Seuss-themed event aimed to celebrate and honor the connection between our patients, their families and the nurses, physicians and staff who care for them.

Visit our Facebook page to see more photos and special thanks to the Duke Regional Hospital Auxiliary for sponsoring this event!

 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

DSC_5703October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a time dedicated to increasing awareness and early detection of the disease.

The American Cancer Society offers the following recommendations:

  • Women age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health.
  • Women in their 20s and 30s should have a clinical breast exam (CBE) as part of a regular health exam by a health professional preferably every three years. Starting at age 40, women should have a CBE by a health professional every year.
  • Breast self-exam (BSE) is an option for women starting in their 20s. Women should report any breast changes to their health professional right away.
  • Women who are at high risk for breast cancer based on certain factors should get an MRI and a mammogram every year. The American Cancer Society recommends against MRI screening for women whose lifetime risk of breast cancer is less than 15 percent.

To learn more about breast cancer, including additional early detection tips, visit cancer.org.

For the Caregiver

seniorsAre you currently the caregiver for a sick or hospitalized loved one? While you are making sure your loved one’s needs are being met, don’t neglect your own. Caregiving is a stressful and time-consuming job. You may neglect your diet, normal exercise routine and sleep needs. You may find you have little or no time to spend with friends, relax or just be by yourself for a while. But down time is important. Don’t be reluctant to ask for help in caring for your loved one. Find out more about how you can ease the stress of caregiving at the resources below.

CAREGIVER RESOURCES

Administration on Aging
www.aoa.gov

Family Caregiver Alliance
www.caregiver.org
National Center on Caregiving

www.caregiving.com
Online support groups and articles on caregiving

Duke Family Support Program at Duke University Medical Center
www.dukefamilysupport.org

Eldercare Locator
800-677-1116 or www.eldercare.gov
Help with locating aging services throughout the U.S.

Medicare
http://www.medicare.gov or 800-MEDICARE
Official U.S. government site for people with Medicare

National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys
www.naela.org
Legal help for seniors and people with special needs

National Alliance for Caregiving
www.caregiving.org
Support for family caregivers and the professionals who serve them

Caregivers Action Network
http://www.caregiveraction.org
Support for caregivers of chronically ill, aged or disabled loved ones